Definition and List of Popular Abbreviations in English

You’ve probably heard the word abbreviation before and you might have a fair idea as to what an abbreviation actually is. However, you might not be entirely certain about your own knowledge and you might be looking at some abbreviations, sms abbreviation and wondering exactly why or how they were abbreviated in the first place. Whatever the case, we’re here to talk you through what abbreviations are and why they are used in our language.

Abbreviation

What Is An Abbreviation?

An abbreviation is a way to shorten or word or a phrase to make it easier to understand and to save time while trying to type out or say a sentence involving that phrase. There are plenty of abbreviations in the English language, some of which are used every single day, and some are only ever used in very specific circumstances.

Most abbreviations take the form of about three or four letters and do a great job of keeping sentences short and to the point. It’s also pretty easy to work out what an abbreviation can stand for even if you don’t know the initial context, although if you still can’t figure it out a quick online search will give you the answer.

Why Do We Use Abbreviations?

We use abbreviations to shorten forms of words or lengthy phrases. It makes for easier and more concise speech when we are able to talk using abbreviations. Though most of the words or phrases that started before the abbreviations aren’t difficult to say, it still saves plenty of time and energy not having to worry about them in the first place.

List of Common Abbreviations

  • A.S.A.P. – as soon as possible
  • ACE – a cool experience
  • AD – Anno Domini, “The Year of Our Lord.”
  • AD – awesome dude
  • AFAIK – as far as I know
  • AFK – away from keyboard
  • AM/PM – ante meridiem (before noon), post meridiem (after noon)
  • ANI – age not important
  • approx. – approximately
  • appt. – appointment
  • apt. – apartment
  • Ave. – Avenue
  • B.Y.O.B. – bring your own bottle
  • BA – Bachelor of Arts
  • Blvd. – Boulevard
  • BRB – be right back
  • BS – Bachelor of Science
  • c – cup/cups
  • c/o – care of
  • CEO – Chief Executive Officer
  • CFO – Chief Financial Officer
  • CMO – Chief Marketing Officer
  • CUL – see you later
  • CWYL – chat with you later
  • Cyn. – Canyon
  • D.I.Y. – Do it yourself
  • DC – Doctor of Chiropractic
  • dept. – department
  • Dr. – Drive
  • E – east
  • e.g. – exampli gratia, “example given.”
  • E.T.A. – estimated time of arrival
  • est. – established
  • etc – etcetera, “and other things.”
  • EVP – Executive Vice President
  • gal – gallon
  • i.e. – id est, “that is.”
  • IIRC – if I recall/remember correctly
  • IQ – ignorance quotient
  • JD – Juris Doctor
  • lb – pound/pounds
  • Ln. – Lane
  • LOL – laugh out loud
  • M.PHIL or MPHIL – Master of Philosophy
  • MA – Master of Arts
  • MD – Managing Director
  • min. – minute or minimum
  • misc. – miscellaneous
  • Mr. – Mister
  • Mrs. – Mistress (pronounced Missus)
  • N – north
  • n.b. – nota bene, “take notice.”
  • NE – northeast
  • no. – number
  • NP – no problem
  • NW – northwest
  • P.S. – post script, “written after.”
  • PA – Personal Assistant
  • pt – pint
  • qt – quart
  • R.S.V.P. – Répondez, s’il vous plait, French for “please reply.”
  • Rd. – Road
  • ROFL – rolling on the floor laughing
  • S – south
  • SE – southeast
  • St. – Street
  • SVP – Senior Vice President
  • SW – southwest
  • tbs, tbsp or T – tablespoon/tablespoons
  • tel. – telephone
  • temp. – temperature or temporary
  • tsp or t – teaspoon/teaspoons
  • TY – thank you
  • vet. – veteran or veterinarian
  • viz – videlicet, “namely.”
  • VP – Vice President
  • vs. – versus
  • W – west
  • WC – wrong conversation
  • TBH – To be honest
  • WYM – What you mean
  • LMAO – Laughing my ass off
  • HMU – Hit me up
  • IMO – In my opinion

Abbreviation | Infographic

Abbreviation | Picture 1

Abbreviation 1

Abbreviation | Picture 2

Abbreviation 3

Abbreviation | Picture 3

Abbreviation 2

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