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Conjunctive Adverbs | Types, Usage, and Examples with Useful List

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Have you ever wondered how to make your writing more coherent and easy to follow? In this article, we’ll take a closer look at what conjunctive adverbs are, the different types of conjunctive adverbs, how to punctuate them correctly, and common errors to avoid. We’ll also provide you with a comprehensive list of conjunctive adverbs, along with examples of how to use them in sentences.

What are Conjunctive Adverbs?

Conjunctive adverbs are words that connect two independent clauses or sentences together, showing the relationship between them. They are used to indicate a contrast, addition, cause and effect, sequence, comparison, or other types of relationships between ideas.

Conjunctive adverbs can be a powerful tool for writers, helping to make their writing more coherent and easy to follow. In the next section, we’ll take a closer look at some examples of conjunctive adverbs and how they are used in sentences.

List of Conjunctive Adverbs

Conjunctive Adverbs

Types of Conjunctive Adverbs

There are several types of conjunctive adverbs, each of which serves a different function in connecting ideas together. Some common types of conjunctive adverbs include:

  • Time: shows the relationship between two events in time (e.g. “meanwhile”, “subsequently”, “simultaneously”)
  • Place: shows the relationship between two locations (e.g. “here”, “there”, “everywhere”)
  • Manner: shows how something is done (e.g. “slowly”, “easily”, “carefully”)
  • Cause and effect: shows the reason for something happening (e.g. “therefore”, “consequently”, “thus”)
  • Comparison: shows the similarities or differences between two things (e.g. “likewise”, “in contrast”, “similarly”)
  • Degree: shows the intensity or extent of something (e.g. “very”, “completely”, “totally”)

Conjunctive Adverbs Rules & Usage

The purpose of Conjunctions is to connect. They join words, phrases, or clauses together to identify what the writer is saying. These connecting words provide smooth transitions from one idea to another.

When the job of an adverb is to connect ideas, we call it a conjunctive adverb.

Conjunctive adverbs are parts of speech that are used to connect one clause to another. They are also used to show sequence, contrast, cause and effect, and other relationships. In this situation, the conjunctive adverb acts like a coordinating conjunction, connecting two complete ideas.

MAIN CLAUSE  ; + Conjunctive Adverb  , + MAIN CLAUSE.

Usage of Conjunctive Adverbs

Conjunctive adverbs are versatile words that can be used in various ways to connect ideas and sentences together. In this section, we will discuss how to use conjunctive adverbs in different contexts.

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In a Single Sentence

In a single sentence, conjunctive adverbs can be used to connect two independent clauses. For example:

  • I love to play soccer; however, I am not very good at it.

In this sentence, “however” is a conjunctive adverb that shows the relationship between the two independent clauses. It indicates a contrast between the speaker’s love for soccer and their lack of skill at the sport.

Other examples of conjunctive adverbs that can be used in a single sentence include “moreover,” “nevertheless,” and “therefore.”

Between Two Sentences

Conjunctive adverbs can also be used to connect two sentences together. In this case, the conjunctive adverb is usually followed by a semicolon and a comma. For example:

  • I love to play soccer; however, I am not very good at it. My brother, on the other hand, is a great soccer player.

In this example, “however” is used to connect the first sentence to the second sentence. It indicates a contrast between the speaker’s lack of skill at soccer and their brother’s proficiency in the sport.

Other examples of conjunctive adverbs that can be used to connect two sentences include “consequently,” “furthermore,” and “likewise.”

In a Series of Sentences

Finally, conjunctive adverbs can be used to connect a series of sentences together. In this case, the conjunctive adverb is usually followed by a period. For example:

  • I love to play soccer. However, I am not very good at it. My brother, on the other hand, is a great soccer player. Consequently, he plays on the school team.

In this example, “however” is used to connect the first and second sentences, while “consequently” is used to connect the third and fourth sentences. The conjunctive adverbs help to show the relationship between the ideas in each sentence.

Other examples of conjunctive adverbs that can be used to connect a series of sentences include “meanwhile,” “otherwise,” and “then.”

Conjunctive Adverbs List

Here’s a comprehensive list of conjunctive adverbs grouped by type:

Time:

  • meanwhile
  • subsequently
  • then
  • thereafter
  • eventually
  • previously
  • initially
  • later
  • formerly
  • afterward
  • soon
  • presently
  • formerly
  • afterwards
  • presently
  • earlier
  • recently

Place:

  • here
  • there
  • wherever
  • anywhere
  • somewhere

Manner:

  • easily
  • quickly
  • slowly
  • carefully
  • badly
  • well
  • similarly
  • differently
  • likewise
  • still
  • also
  • likewise

Cause and effect:

  • therefore
  • accordingly
  • consequently
  • hence
  • thus
  • so
  • otherwise
  • however
  • as a result
  • otherwise
  • notwithstanding
  • in contrast

Comparison:

  • likewise
  • similarly
  • like
  • also
  • in the same way
  • equally
  • correspondingly
  • in contrast
  • rather
  • yet
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Degree:

  • very
  • more
  • most
  • almost
  • hardly
  • nearly
  • fully
  • completely
  • totally
  • rather
  • less
  • equally

Condition:

  • if
  • unless
  • whether
  • provided that
  • on the condition that
  • granted that
  • assuming that
  • in case

Concession:

  • nevertheless
  • nonetheless
  • still
  • even so
  • though
  • although
  • even though
  • despite
  • in spite of
  • notwithstanding

Purpose:

  • so that
  • in order that
  • lest

Summary or conclusion:

  • in conclusion
  • in summary
  • to summarize
  • finally
  • all in all
  • in brief
  • thus
  • accordingly
  • consequently
  • hence
  • therefore

Example Sentences of Conjunctive Adverbs

Time:

  • She finished her work and then went for a walk.
  • Previously, he had never been interested in art.

Place:

  • He left his keys somewhere and couldn’t find them.
  • I will go wherever you go.

Manner:

  • She spoke slowly so everyone could understand.
  • He performed badly in the exam.

Cause and effect:

  • She didn’t study for the test; thus, she failed.
  • He was sick; therefore, he didn’t come to the party.

Comparison:

  • She works hard; likewise, he also works hard.
  • He likes to read; on the other hand, I prefer to watch movies.

Degree:

  • I am most interested in the history of Ancient Rome.
  • The restaurant was almost empty when we arrived.

Condition:

  • If you don’t come early, we will leave without you.
  • I am not sure whether I will attend the meeting.

Concession:

  • He was tired; nonetheless, he continued to work.
  • Even though it was raining, he went for a run.”

Purpose:

  • She studied hard so that she could get good grades.
  • I am taking a jacket in case it gets cold.

Summary or conclusion:

  • In conclusion, we can say that the project was a success.
  • Finally, after a long day, she could relax.

Conjunctive Adverbs vs Coordinating Conjunctions

In English grammar, there are two types of words that can connect two clauses or sentences: conjunctive adverbs and coordinating conjunctions. While they serve similar purposes, there are some key differences between the two.

Conjunctive Adverbs

Conjunctive adverbs are words that join two independent clauses or sentences. They are often used to show a relationship between the two ideas, such as contrast, cause and effect, or time. Examples of conjunctive adverbs include “however,” “therefore,” “meanwhile,” and “consequently.”

One important thing to note about conjunctive adverbs is that they cannot stand alone as a conjunction. They always need to be accompanied by a comma or semicolon to separate the two clauses.

Coordinating Conjunctions

Coordinating conjunctions are words that also connect two independent clauses or sentences. They are often used to show a relationship between the two ideas, such as addition, contrast, or choice. Examples of coordinating conjunctions include “and,” “but,” “or,” and “yet.”

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Unlike conjunctive adverbs, coordinating conjunctions can stand alone as a conjunction. They do not need to be accompanied by a comma or semicolon, unless they are connecting three or more items in a list.

Choosing the Right Connector

So, when should you use a conjunctive adverb and when should you use a coordinating conjunction? It depends on the relationship you want to show between the two ideas.

If you want to show a cause and effect relationship, you might use a conjunctive adverb like “therefore” or “consequently.” If you want to show a contrast, you might use a conjunctive adverb like “however” or “nevertheless.” If you want to show addition, you might use a coordinating conjunction like “and.”

Frequently Asked Questions

What are some examples of conjunctive adverbs?

Some common examples of conjunctive adverbs include “however,” “therefore,” “moreover,” “meanwhile,” and “consequently.” These adverbs are used to connect and modify two independent clauses, showing the relationship between them.

How can conjunctive adverbs be used in writing?

Conjunctive adverbs can be used to create a smooth transition between ideas in writing. They help to show the relationship between two ideas, whether it is a contrast, cause and effect, sequence, or other relationship. By using conjunctive adverbs, you can enhance the coherence and flow of your writing.

What is the difference between a conjunctive adverb and a conjunction?

A conjunction is a word that connects two words, phrases, or clauses. A conjunctive adverb, on the other hand, is a type of adverb that connects two independent clauses. While conjunctions are used to join words or phrases within a sentence, conjunctive adverbs are used to join entire sentences.

How do conjunctive adverbs work with semicolons?

When using a conjunctive adverb with a semicolon, place the semicolon at the end of the first clause and use the conjunctive adverb at the beginning of the second clause. Then, place a comma after the conjunctive adverb to separate it from the second clause. This creates a clear and concise transition between the two independent clauses.

Are there any rules for using conjunctive adverbs correctly?

Yes, there are some rules to follow when using conjunctive adverbs. Firstly, they should be used to connect two independent clauses. Secondly, they should be used to show the relationship between the two clauses, whether it is a contrast, cause and effect, sequence, or other relationship. Lastly, they should be punctuated correctly, with a semicolon and comma when used with two independent cla

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Anil Kumar

Tuesday 28th of February 2023

Nice content to understand grammatical knowledge

Fatya mida

Sunday 26th of February 2023

Please when you write différent words write before them thé same Word in frensch be cause we do not understand all thé sentence thank youvery much .i wait your answer.

Roda

Monday 22nd of November 2021

good!