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Demonstratives Adjectives & Pronouns – This, That, These, Those

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In this page, we will explore the different types of demonstratives and how to use them correctly. We will cover the four main demonstratives, which are the “near” demonstratives, “this” and “these,” and the “far” demonstratives, “that” and “those.” We will also provide example sentences to illustrate how to use each demonstrative correctly.

Demonstratives Definition

Demonstratives are words that indicate which entities are being referred to and distinguish those entities from others. They are typically deictic, meaning their meaning depends on a particular frame of reference, and cannot be understood without context.

There are four primary demonstratives in English: this, that, these, and those. This and that are used to refer to singular nouns, while these and those are used for plural nouns.

For example, “this book” refers to a singular book that is near the speaker, while “that book” refers to a singular book that is farther away from the speaker. “These books” refers to a group of books that are near the speaker, while “those books” refers to a group of books that are farther away from the speaker.

Demonstratives can also be used as pronouns, replacing a noun in a sentence. For instance, “This is my car” can be shortened to “This is mine.” Similarly, “Those are her shoes” can be shortened to “Those are hers.”

It is important to note that demonstratives can also function as demonstrative adjectives. In this case, they modify a noun and indicate which entity is being referred to. For example, “this apple” uses “this” as a demonstrative adjective to modify the noun “apple.”

Demonstratives

Types of Demonstratives

As we have seen, demonstratives are words that point out or indicate something. In English, there are two types of demonstratives: Demonstrative Adjectives and Demonstrative Pronouns.

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Demonstrative Adjectives

Demonstrative Adjectives are used to modify a noun or a pronoun and indicate which one is being referred to. They answer the question “which one?” and are used to point out specific people, places, or things. The four demonstrative adjectives in English are “this,” “that,” “these,” and “those.”

For example:

  • This car is mine.
  • That book on the shelf is yours.
  • These apples are delicious.
  • Those shoes are too small for me.

Demonstrative Pronouns

Demonstrative Pronouns are used to replace a noun and indicate which one is being referred to. They also answer the question “which one?” and are used to point out specific people, places, or things. The four demonstrative pronouns in English are “this one,” “that one,” “these ones,” and “those ones.”

For example:

  • I want this one, not that one.
  • These ones are my favorite.
  • That one over there is too expensive.
  • Those ones are too big for me.

It is important to note that demonstrative pronouns can also be used as standalone sentences, without a noun. For example:

  • This is delicious!
  • That is too expensive.
  • These are my favorite.
  • Those are too big for me.

In conclusion, demonstratives are an important part of English language. By using demonstratives, we can indicate which person, place, or thing we are referring to, making our communication clear and effective.

Usage of Demonstratives

In this section, we will cover the usage of demonstratives in English. Demonstratives are pronouns that point to a particular noun or to the noun it replaces. There are four demonstratives in English: this, that, these, and those. We use demonstratives to indicate the proximity of a person or object to the speaker.

Singular and Plural Forms

We use “this” and “that” for singular nouns and “these” and “those” for plural countable nouns. For example, “this” can be used to refer to a singular object that is close to the speaker, such as “This book is mine.” On the other hand, “these” can be used to refer to multiple objects that are close to the speaker, such as “These books are mine.” Similarly, “that” can be used to refer to a singular object that is far from the speaker, such as “That car is expensive.” While “those” can be used to refer to multiple objects that are far from the speaker, such as “Those cars are expensive.”

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Distance and Demonstratives

Demonstratives can also be used to specify the distance of something in space or time in relation to the speaker. “This” and “these” refer to objects near the speaker, while “that” and “those” refer to objects far from the speaker. For example, “This apple looks ripe,” can be used to refer to an apple that is close to the speaker. Similarly, “That building is tall,” can be used to refer to a building that is far from the speaker.

In conclusion, demonstratives are essential in English grammar as they help to specify the proximity of a person or object to the speaker. Understanding the correct usage of demonstratives can help to improve one’s communication skills in English.

Common Mistakes with Demonstratives

When using demonstratives, it’s important to choose the correct word to ensure clarity in communication. Here are some common mistakes people make with demonstratives:

Confusing Singular and Plural Forms

One common mistake is confusing singular and plural forms of demonstrative adjectives. For example, using “this” to describe multiple items instead of “these.” It’s important to use “this” for singular objects and “these” for plural objects.

  • Incorrect: This flowers are beautiful.
  • Correct: These flowers are beautiful.

Using the Wrong Demonstrative

Choosing the wrong demonstrative can also cause confusion. For example, using “that” instead of “this” when referring to something close to you. It’s important to use “this” for objects that are near you and “that” for objects that are farther away.

  • Incorrect: That book is right in front of me.
  • Correct: This book is right in front of me.

Using Demonstrative Pronouns as Adjectives

Demonstrative pronouns, such as “this” and “that,” are used to replace a noun. Demonstrative adjectives, on the other hand, are used to modify a noun. Using a demonstrative pronoun as an adjective can lead to confusion.

  • Incorrect: That is my book. This is your.
  • Correct: That is my book. This is your book.
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By avoiding these common mistakes, we can ensure that our communication is clear and effective.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the meaning of demonstratives in grammar?

Demonstratives are words that indicate the position or distance of a noun in relation to the speaker. They are used to point out something specific and can be used as pronouns or determiners. Demonstratives help to clarify the meaning of a sentence by showing the location of the object being referred to.

What are some examples of demonstrative pronouns?

Demonstrative pronouns are used to replace a noun in a sentence. The four main demonstrative pronouns are “this”, “that”, “these”, and “those”. For example, “This is my car” or “Those are your shoes”.

How do you use demonstrative determiners in a sentence?

Demonstrative determiners are used to modify a noun in a sentence. They come before the noun and help to clarify which specific object is being referred to. For example, “This car is mine” or “That book belongs to her”.

What are the differences between ‘this’, ‘that’, ‘these’, and ‘those’?

The main difference between ‘this’ and ‘that’ is that ‘this’ is used to refer to something that is close to the speaker, while ‘that’ is used to refer to something that is further away. Similarly, ‘these’ and ‘those’ are used to refer to multiple objects that are close or far away from the speaker, respectively. For example, “This is my phone” (close to the speaker) or “That is a beautiful sunset” (far from the speaker).

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Rakesh kumar patel

Sunday 17th of September 2023

Nice lesson for demonstrative pronoun thanks for this