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Idioms About Friendship | 40+ Popular Idioms and Proverbs about Friendships

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In this article, we will cover a variety of idioms about friendship, from the well-known “a friend in need is a friend indeed” to lesser-known expressions like “friend to all is a friend to none.” We will provide examples of how to use each idiom in a sentence and explain their meanings in context. So, whether you’re a beginner or an advanced English learner, you’re sure to find something useful in this article. Let’s get started!

Idioms About Friendship

Idioms About Friendship

List of Friendship Idioms

Here is a list of popular idioms talking about friends and friendships in English:

  • Like two peas in a pod
  • To be as thick as thieves
  • To bury the hatchet
  • To clear the air
  • A shoulder to cry on
  • Strike up a friendship
  • To see eye to eye with someone
  • Friends in high places
  • To know someone inside out
  • To build bridges
  • Birds of a feather flock together
  • To hit it off
  • To get on like a house on fire
  • To speak the same language
  • To get on swimmingly
  • Close-knit
  • Through thick and thin
  • To be joined at the hip
  • To be on the same page/wavelength
  • To get on famously
  • To make strange bedfellows
  • To move in the same circles

Idioms Related to Friendship with Meaning

Like two peas in a pod

  • Two people or things that are very similar to each other, or go very well together.

To be as thick as thieves

  • To be very close or friendly

To bury the hatchet

  •  Make peace; end a quarrel, settle one’s differences to become friends again.

To clear the air

  • Get rid of all doubts and negative feelings.

A shoulder to cry on

  • Someone who listens to your problems

Strike up a friendship

  • Meaning: To become friends

To see eye to eye with someone

  • To agree with someone

Friends in high places

  • Have friends who have important or influential positions

To know someone inside out

  • To know someone very well

To build bridges

  • To promote friendly relations between people or groups

Birds of a feather flock together

  • People who have the same outlook/tastes/interests will be found in each other’s company

To hit it off

  • To find yourself immediately and naturally friendly with someone

To get on like a house on fire

  • To get on very well with someone

To speak the same language

  • To understand someone, as a result, your shared values or opinions

To get on swimmingly

  • To get on very well with someone

Close-knit

  • United or bound together by strong relationships and common interests.

Through thick and thin

  • Under all circumstances, no matter how difficult.

To be joined at the hip

  • To be extremely close to someone, so you don’t like to be apart.

To be on the same page/wavelength

  • To be in agreement

To get on famously

  • To get on very well with someone

To make strange bedfellows

  • To make unlikely companions

To move in the same circles

  • To socialize with the same people all of whom have a similar background or lifestyle

Common Friendship Idioms

As we all know, friends are an important part of our lives. They are the ones who are always there for us, through thick and thin. In English, there are many idioms that describe the different aspects of friendship. In this section, we will cover some of the most common friendship idioms.

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Idioms About Trust

Trust is an essential component of any friendship. Here are some idioms that describe the importance of trust in a friendship:

Idiom Meaning
A friend in need is a friend indeed A true friend is someone who is there for you when you need them the most.
Keep faith with To remain loyal to someone.
Have someone’s back To support and protect someone.

Idioms About Support

Friendship is all about supporting each other. Here are some idioms that describe the importance of support in a friendship:

Idiom Meaning
Stand by someone To support someone no matter what.
Shoulder to cry on A person who listens to your problems and offers emotional support.
Be there for someone To support someone emotionally or physically.

Idioms About Shared Experiences

Shared experiences are what bring friends closer together. Here are some idioms that describe the importance of shared experiences in a friendship:

Idiom Meaning
Birds of a feather flock together People who are similar tend to be friends.
Two peas in a pod Two people who are very similar.
Cut from the same cloth Two people who share the same values or characteristics.

These are just a few of the many idioms that describe the different aspects of friendship. Whether it’s trust, support, or shared experiences, these idioms show us just how important friends are in our lives.

Using Friendship Idioms in Conversations

As we have learned, idioms are an essential part of the English language. They add color and personality to our conversations, making them more interesting and engaging. In this section, we will discuss how to use friendship idioms in casual and formal conversations.

In Casual Conversations

Using idioms in casual conversations can help you connect with others and make your conversations more enjoyable. Here are some examples of friendship idioms you can use in casual conversations:

Idiom Example
Friends in high places “I heard John got the job. He must have some friends in high places.”
Thick as thieves “Me and my best friend are thick as thieves. We tell each other everything.”
Two peas in a pod “Those two are like two peas in a pod. They’re always hanging out together.”

Using these idioms in casual conversations can help you build stronger relationships with your friends and acquaintances.

In Formal Conversations

Using idioms in formal conversations can be tricky, as you need to be careful not to sound too informal or casual. However, using idioms in the right context can make you sound more knowledgeable and sophisticated. Here are some examples of friendship idioms you can use in formal conversations:

Idiom Example
A friend in need is a friend indeed “In times of crisis, a friend in need is a friend indeed.”
Birds of a feather flock together “The members of the board are all birds of a feather. They all have similar backgrounds and beliefs.”
Old friends are the best friends “I have many acquaintances, but my old friends are the best friends.”

Using these idioms in formal conversations can help you sound more knowledgeable and sophisticated, but be sure to use them in the right context and with the appropriate tone.

In conclusion, using friendship idioms in conversations can help you connect with others, make your conversations more interesting, and sound more knowledgeable and sophisticated. Just be sure to use them in the right context and with the appropriate tone.

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Friendship Idioms in Literature

As English learners, we can find idioms about friendship in literature. These idioms are used by authors to describe relationships between characters, and they help us understand the dynamics of these relationships. Here are a few examples:

  • “Birds of a feather flock together” – This idiom is used to describe a group of people who have similar interests or characteristics. It is often used to describe a group of friends who share common traits or hobbies.
  • “A friend in need is a friend indeed” – This idiom means that a true friend is someone who helps you when you are in trouble. It is often used to describe a friend who is always there for you, no matter what.
  • “To have a heart-to-heart” – This idiom means to have a serious and honest conversation with someone. It is often used to describe a conversation between friends who need to discuss a difficult topic.
  • “To be on the same wavelength” – This idiom means to have a similar way of thinking or understanding. It is often used to describe friends who have a deep understanding of each other.

These idioms are just a few examples of how authors use language to describe friendships in literature. By understanding these idioms, we can gain a deeper appreciation for the relationships between characters in our favorite books and movies.

Friendship Idioms in Movies and TV Shows

We all have our favorite movies and TV shows that we love to watch over and over again. These shows often have characters that we grow to love and root for. They also often use idioms to describe the relationships between these characters. Here are some popular friendship idioms used in movies and TV shows:

  • BFF (Best Friends Forever): This acronym is used to describe a close friendship between two people. It is often used between teenage girls, but it can be used by anyone. For example, in the movie “Mean Girls”, the character Gretchen Wieners refers to her friends as her “BFFs”.
  • Ride or Die: This idiom is used to describe a friend who is always there for you, no matter what. They will “ride” with you through thick and thin, and they will “die” for you if necessary. For example, in the movie “The Fast and the Furious”, the character Dominic Toretto refers to his friend Brian O’Conner as his “ride or die”.
  • Brother from Another Mother: This idiom is used to describe a close friend who is not related to you by blood. It is often used between men. For example, in the TV show “How I Met Your Mother”, the character Marshall Eriksen refers to his friend Ted Mosby as his “brother from another mother”.
  • Wingman: This idiom is used to describe a friend who helps you pick up romantic partners. They are there to support you and make you look good. For example, in the movie “Top Gun”, the character Goose is the wingman for his friend Maverick.
  • Partner in Crime: This idiom is used to describe a friend who you do mischievous or illegal activities with. They are your “partner” in these activities. For example, in the TV show “Breaking Bad”, the characters Jesse Pinkman and Walter White are partners in the illegal drug trade.

These are just a few examples of the many friendship idioms used in movies and TV shows. They show how idioms can be used to describe the complex relationships between friends.

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Proverbs and Saying about Friendships

proverb is a simple, concrete, traditional saying that expresses a truth based on common sense or experience. Proverbs give some form of life advice. And the following is the most common proverbs relating to friends and friendships:

  • A friend’s eye is a good mirror. (Irish Proverb)
  • True friends are like diamonds, precious but rare, false friends are like autumn leaves, found everywhere.
  • Who seeks a faultless friend remains friendless. (Turkish proverb)
  • Friends are those rare people who ask how we are and then wait to hear the answer.
  • A friend in need is a friend indeed. (Latin Proverb)
  • Friends are like walls, sometimes you lean on them and sometimes it’s good just knowing they’re there.
  • A good friend is like a four – leaf clover, hard to find and lucky to have. (Irish Proverb)
  • Best friend doesn’t necessarily have to talk every day. They don’t even need to talk for weeks. But when they do, it’s like they never stopped taking.
  • Whoever covers an offense seeks love, but he who repeats a matter separates close friends.
  • There is a friend who sticks closer than a brother.
  • A friend loves at all times, and a brother is born for adversity.
  • Faithful are the wounds of a friend; profuse are the kisses of an enemy.
  • A real friend is one who walks in when the rest of the world walks out.
  • A dog is man’s best friend
  • A friend to all is a friend to none
  • A man is known by his friends
  • Absence makes the heart grow fonder
  • False friends are worse than open enemies
  • Friends are thieves of time
  • Friendship is like money, easier made than kept
  • Friendship is love with understanding
  • A friend at hand is better than a relative at a distance
  • Keep your friends close but your enemies closer
  • Lend your money. Lose your friend
  • A man who has friends must himself be friendly
  • The rich knows not who is his friend
  • Strangers are just friends waiting to happen

Frequently Asked Questions

What are some common idioms about friendship?

There are many idioms in the English language that describe friendships. Some of the most common ones include “a shoulder to cry on,” “birds of a feather flock together,” “two peas in a pod,” and “thick as thieves.” These idioms are used to describe close relationships and the bond between friends.

What are some proverbs and idioms that describe close relationships?

Proverbs and idioms that describe close relationships include “blood is thicker than water,” “you scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours,” and “in good times and bad.” These expressions are used to describe the loyalty and support that comes with close relationships.

Do you know any idioms for crazy friends?

Yes, there are a few idioms that describe crazy friends. One of them is “off one’s rocker,” which means someone is acting crazy or irrational. Another one is “a few fries short of a Happy Meal,” which means someone is not very smart or is acting foolishly.

What expressions can be used to describe close friends?

Expressions that can be used to describe close friends include “ride or die,” “partner in crime,” “soulmate,” and “kindred spirit.” These expressions emphasize the strong bond and connection between close friends.

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