Skip to Content

List of 100+ Intransitive Verbs | Useful Intransitive Verb Examples

Sharing is caring!

Are you familiar with intransitive verbs? Intransitive verbs are an essential part of English grammar, and understanding them can help you improve your writing and communication skills. In this article, we’ll explore what intransitive verbs are, how they differ from transitive verbs, and provide examples to help you better understand their usage.

Intransitive Verbs

intransitive verbs

Understanding Intransitive Verbs

Definition

Intransitive verbs are verbs that do not require a direct object to complete their meaning. They are different from transitive verbs, which require a direct object to make sense. For example, in the sentence “Sarah laughed,” “laughed” is an intransitive verb because it does not require a direct object. The action of the verb only involves Sarah, the subject of the sentence.

Characteristics

Intransitive verbs have a few key characteristics that distinguish them from transitive verbs:

  • They do not require a direct object to complete their meaning.
  • They often describe actions that are complete in themselves, without affecting another object or person.
  • They cannot be transformed into passive voice because there is no object to become the subject of the sentence.
  • They can sometimes be followed by adverbs or prepositions to modify the verb.

Here are some examples of intransitive verbs:

  • “She sings beautifully.” (The verb “sings” is intransitive because it does not require a direct object.)
  • “The sun sets in the west.” (The verb “sets” is intransitive because it does not require a direct object.)
  • “He ran quickly.” (The verb “ran” is intransitive because it does not require a direct object, but it is followed by the adverb “quickly” to modify the verb.)

It is important to note that some verbs can be both transitive and intransitive, depending on how they are used in a sentence. For example, the verb “read” can be transitive when it has a direct object (“She read the book”) or intransitive when it does not (“He likes to read”).

Intransitive Verb Examples

Example Sentences

An intransitive verb has two characteristics. First, it is an action verb, expressing a doable activity like arrive, go, lie, sneeze, sit, die, etc. Second, unlike a transitive verb, it will not have a direct object receiving the action.

Here are some intransitive verb examples:

  • It is raining.
  • When he finished the race, he barfed.
  • Water evaporates when it’s hot.
  • He’s been singing all day.
  • You’ve grown since I last saw you.
  • They run.
  • He died.
  • She slept.
  • It snows.

Common Examples of Intransitive Verbs

Intransitive verbs are those verbs that do not require an object to complete their meaning. They can stand alone as a complete sentence and make sense without any additional information. Here are some common examples of intransitive verbs:

Related  120 Most Important Academic Verbs in English

Agree

Agree is an intransitive verb that means to have the same opinion or to be in harmony with something or someone. For example, “You and your friend agree on the movie choice.”

Arrive

Arrive is another intransitive verb that means to reach a destination. It does not require an object to complete its meaning. For instance, “The train arrived at the station on time.”

Continue

Continue is an intransitive verb that means to keep going or to persist. It does not require an object to complete its meaning. For example, “The rain continued all day long.”

Laugh

Laugh is an intransitive verb that means to express happiness or amusement through sound. It does not require an object to complete its meaning. For instance, “You laughed so hard at the joke.”

Sleep

Sleep is an intransitive verb that means to rest or be in a state of unconsciousness. It does not require an object to complete its meaning. For example, “You slept peacefully all night long.”

Usage of Intransitive Verbs

Intransitive verbs are verbs that do not require a direct object to complete their meaning. They stand alone in a sentence, and the action they describe is not done to someone or something. In this section, we will explore the usage of intransitive verbs in sentences and literature.

In Sentences

Intransitive verbs can be used to create simple sentences that express a complete thought. For example:

  • Sarah laughed.
  • The sun rose.
  • The baby slept.

In these sentences, the intransitive verbs “laughed,” “rose,” and “slept” do not require a direct object to complete their meaning. They stand alone and express a complete thought.

Intransitive verbs can also be used with adverbs and adjectives to add more detail to the sentence. For example:

  • The bird sang sweetly.
  • The child ran quickly.
  • The flowers smelled fragrant.

In these sentences, the adverbs and adjectives modify the intransitive verbs and add more detail to the sentence.

In Literature

Intransitive verbs are commonly used in literature to create imagery and convey emotions. They can be used to create a sense of movement, sound, or emotion. For example:

  • The leaves rustled in the wind.
  • The waves crashed against the shore.
  • The crowd cheered loudly.

In these examples, the intransitive verbs create a sense of movement and sound, and they help to convey the emotions of the scene.

Intransitive verbs can also be used to create ambiguity and uncertainty in literature. For example:

  • The door creaked.
  • The phone rang.
Related  Commonly Used Transitive Verbs in English

In these examples, the intransitive verbs leave the reader wondering who or what is responsible for the action. This creates suspense and adds to the overall mood of the scene.

Types of Intransitive Verbs

There are two types of intransitive verbs: unaccusative verbs and unergative verbs.

Unaccusative Verbs

Unaccusative verbs describe an action that happens to the subject of the sentence. They do not have a direct object. Instead, they have a subject that undergoes a change. Here are some examples of unaccusative verbs:

  • The vase broke.
  • The tree fell.
  • The cake burned.

As you can see, these verbs do not have a direct object. Instead, they describe an action that happens to the subject of the sentence.

Unergative Verbs

Unergative verbs describe an action that the subject of the sentence performs. They do not have a direct object. Instead, they have a subject that performs an action. Here are some examples of unergative verbs:

  • She laughed.
  • He ran.
  • They danced.

As you can see, these verbs do not have a direct object. Instead, they describe an action that the subject of the sentence performs.

It’s important to know the difference between these two types of intransitive verbs, as they can be used in different ways in a sentence. By understanding the types of intransitive verbs, you can improve your writing and communication skills.

Intransitive Verb List

Learn list of 100+ intransitive verbs in English.

  • Agree
  • Appear
  • Arrive
  • Become
  • Belong
  • Collapse
  • Consist
  • Cost
  • Cough
  • Cry
  • Depend
  • Die
  • Disappear
  • Emerge
  • Exist
  • Explode
  • Fade
  • Fall
  • Fast
  • Float
  • Fly
  • Gallop
  • Go
  • Grow
  • Happen
  • Have
  • Hiccup / hic-cough
  • Inquire
  • Jump
  • Kneel
  • Knock (sound)
  • Last (endure)
  • Laugh
  • Lead
  • Lean
  • Leap
  • Learn
  • Left
  • Lie (recline or tell an untruth)
  • Limp
  • Listen
  • Live
  • Look
  • March
  • Mourn
  • Move
  • Occur
  • Panic
  • Party
  • Pause
  • Peep
  • Pose
  • Pounce
  • Pout
  • Pray
  • Preen
  • Read
  • Recline
  • Relax
  • Relent
  • Remain
  • Respond
  • Result
  • Revolt
  • Rise
  • Roll
  • Run
  • Rush
  • Sail
  • Scream
  • Shake
  • Shout
  • Sigh
  • Sit
  • Skip
  • Sleep
  • Slide
  • Smell
  • Smile
  • Snarl
  • Sneeze
  • Soak
  • Spin
  • Spit
  • Sprint
  • Squeak
  • Stagger
  • Stand
  • Stay
  • Swim
  • Swing
  • Twist
  • Vanish
  • Vomit
  • Wade
  • Wait
  • Wake
  • Walk
  • Wander
  • Wave
  • Whirl
  • Wiggle
  • Work
  • Yell

Difference Between Transitive and Intransitive Verbs

As you may have learned from your English classes, verbs can be classified into two categories: transitive and intransitive. Understanding the difference between these two types of verbs is crucial in order to use them correctly in sentences.

Transitive Verbs

Transitive verbs require a direct object to complete their meaning. This means that they are always followed by a noun or pronoun that receives the action of the verb. For example, in the sentence “She ate an apple,” the verb “ate” is transitive because it has a direct object “an apple” that receives the action of eating.

Related  Infinitives: 50+ Important Verbs Followed By Infinitives in English

Here are some more examples of transitive verbs:

  • He kicked the ball.
  • They painted the house.
  • I read the book.

Intransitive Verbs

Intransitive verbs, on the other hand, do not require a direct object to complete their meaning. They express a complete thought without the need for an object. For example, in the sentence “She sneezed,” the verb “sneezed” is intransitive because it does not have a direct object.

Here are some more examples of intransitive verbs:

  • The sun rose.
  • He laughed.
  • She slept.

It is important to note that some verbs can be both transitive and intransitive, depending on how they are used in a sentence. For example, the verb “run” can be transitive when it has a direct object, as in “He ran a marathon,” or intransitive when it does not have a direct object, as in “He runs every morning.”

Frequently Asked Questions

What are some examples of intransitive verbs in sentences?

Intransitive verbs are verbs that don’t take a direct object. Here are some examples of intransitive verbs used in sentences:

  • She laughed.
  • The baby cried.
  • The flowers bloomed.
  • He slept peacefully.

What is the difference between transitive and intransitive verbs?

The main difference between transitive and intransitive verbs is that transitive verbs require a direct object, while intransitive verbs do not. A direct object is a noun or pronoun that receives the action of the verb.

For example, in the sentence “She ate the sandwich,” “ate” is a transitive verb because it requires a direct object, “the sandwich.” In contrast, in the sentence “She ate quickly,” “ate” is an intransitive verb because it does not require a direct object.

How can I teach transitive and intransitive verbs?

One effective way to teach transitive and intransitive verbs is to provide students with examples of each and have them identify whether or not the verb requires a direct object. It can also be helpful to provide students with practice exercises and feedback on their answers.

What are some common intransitive verbs?

Some common intransitive verbs include:

  • Laugh
  • Cry
  • Sleep
  • Run
  • Walk
  • Jump
  • Dance
  • Sing
  • Smile
  • Think

What are some examples of subject-intransitive verb sentences?

Subject-intransitive verb sentences are sentences that consist of a subject and an intransitive verb. Here are some examples:

  • The sun shines.
  • The wind blew.
  • The river flows.
  • The leaves rustled.

What are some ditransitive verb examples?

Ditransitive verbs are verbs that take both a direct and indirect object. Here are some examples:

  • She gave me a gift.
  • He told her a story.
  • They sent us a package.
  • I bought him a book.
English Study Online

Jackson sindayigaya

Sunday 17th of September 2023

But among those ones such as to read and lead can be transitive ones because they can be followed by an object

Jackson sindayigaya

Sunday 17th of September 2023

Thank you for having delivered those intransitive verbs

Sudhan Sagar Joshi

Monday 13th of June 2022

It's a useful 103 Intransitive Verbs list in English.

Victoria Emmanuel

Tuesday 25th of January 2022

Hello pls is picture an intransitive verb

Tamanna Imtiaz faruki

Tuesday 17th of August 2021

Transitive verb and intransitive verb