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Useful Knowledge Idioms in English You Should Know

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Are you looking to improve your English language skills? One of the best ways to do so is by learning idioms. In this article, we will be exploring idioms related to knowledge. Learning these idioms will not only help you understand English speakers better, but it will also help you express yourself more effectively.

10 Popular Knowledge Idioms

1. Knowledge is power

This idiom means that the more knowledge you have, the more powerful you become.

  • For example, “I’m studying hard because I know that knowledge is power.”

2. Know the ropes

To know the ropes means to have a good understanding of how something works.

  • For example, “I’ve been at this job for a few months now, so I know the ropes.”

3. A wealth of knowledge

This idiom means that someone has a lot of knowledge or information.

  • For example, “My grandfather has a wealth of knowledge about World War II.”

4. Learn the ropes

Similar to know the ropes, to learn the ropes means to gain an understanding of how something works.

  • For example, “I’m new to this company, but I’m eager to learn the ropes.”

5. Pick someone’s brain

To pick someone’s brain means to ask them for advice or information.

  • For example, “I need some help with my project, so I’m going to pick my professor’s brain.”

Knowledge Idioms – Image 

Knowledge Idioms

6. Have a finger in every pie

This idiom means to be involved in many different things.

  • For example, “My boss has a finger in every pie, so she knows a lot about what’s going on in the company.”

7. A little bird told me

This idiom is used when you don’t want to reveal where you got your information from.

  • For example, “I heard that the company is going to lay off some employees, but a little bird told me so I can’t say for sure.”

8. In the know

To be in the know means to be well-informed about something.

  • For example, “I’m in the know about the latest trends in fashion because I read fashion magazines regularly.”

9. Brainstorm

To brainstorm means to come up with ideas or solutions to a problem.

  • For example, “Let’s brainstorm some ideas for our new marketing campaign.”

10. Food for thought

This idiom means something that gives you something to think about.

  • For example, “That article on climate change was really food for thought.”

Idioms Related to Academic Knowledge

As an English learner, it’s essential to understand idioms related to academic knowledge as they are commonly used in educational settings. In this section, we will discuss two sub-sections of academic knowledge idioms: “Book Related Idioms” and “School Related Idioms.”

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Book Related Idioms

Books have always been a valuable source of knowledge, and idioms related to books are frequently used in academic settings. Here are some of the most commonly used book-related idioms:

  • Hit the books: This idiom means to study hard, especially for an exam. For example, “I need to hit the books if I want to pass my final exam.”
  • Read between the lines: This idiom means to understand the hidden meaning in a text. For example, “When reading a novel, it’s important to read between the lines to fully understand the author’s message.”
  • Open a book: This idiom means to start learning about a new subject. For example, “I’m excited to open a book and learn more about the history of ancient Egypt.

School Related Idioms

School is where we gain academic knowledge, and there are several idioms related to school that are commonly used. Here are some of the most commonly used school-related idioms:

  • Learn the ropes: This idiom means to learn the basics of a new subject or job. For example, “As a new employee, I need to learn the ropes of the company’s policies and procedures.”
  • Cutting class: This idiom means to skip a class without permission. For example, “I got in trouble for cutting class yesterday.”
  • Teacher’s pet: This idiom refers to a student whom the teacher favors. For example, “Samantha is the teacher’s pet because she always volunteers to help and participates in class discussions.”

Understanding these idioms related to academic knowledge will help you communicate more effectively in educational settings. Remember to use them appropriately and in the right context.

Idioms Related to Practical Knowledge

In addition to academic knowledge, there are many idioms related to practical knowledge that we use in everyday life. These idioms are related to the skills and knowledge that we acquire through our work and life experiences. In this section, we will cover some of the most commonly used idioms related to practical knowledge.

Workplace Related Idioms

  • Get the hang of it: This idiom is used when we learn how to do something by practicing it regularly. For example, “It took me a while to get the hang of using the new software.”
  • Hit the ground running: This idiom is used when we start a new job or project with a lot of energy and enthusiasm. For example, “I’m excited to start my new job and hit the ground running.”
  • Learn the ropes: This idiom is used when we are learning how to do a new job or task. For example, “I’m still learning the ropes in my new position.”
  • Put your nose to the grindstone: This idiom is used when we need to work hard and focus on a task. For example, “I have a lot of work to do, so I need to put my nose to the grindstone.”

Life Experience-Related Idioms

  • Learn from experience: This idiom is used when we learn something by going through a difficult situation. For example, “I learned from experience that it’s not a good idea to procrastinate.”
  • Been there, done that: This idiom is used when we have already experienced something and don’t need to do it again. For example, “I don’t want to go skydiving again – been there, done that.”
  • A baptism of fire: This idiom is used when we experience a difficult situation that tests our abilities. For example, “My first week at the new job was a baptism of fire, but I learned a lot.”
  • A steep learning curve: This idiom is used when we have to learn something difficult quickly. For example, “The new job has a steep learning curve, but I’m up for the challenge.”

Learning these idioms related to practical knowledge will help you communicate more effectively in the workplace and in everyday life.

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Idioms Related to Wisdom

As we gain knowledge and experience, we also gain wisdom. Wisdom is the ability to apply knowledge and experience to make good decisions and judgments. In this section, we will explore some idioms related to wisdom.

Age and Wisdom Idioms

There are many idioms that link age with wisdom. Here are a few examples:

  • With age comes wisdom: This idiom suggests that as we get older, we become wiser.
  • The wisdom of age: This idiom emphasizes the idea that older people have valuable knowledge and experience.
  • Gray hair is a sign of wisdom: This idiom suggests that people with gray hair are wise.

Insight Related Idioms

Insight is the ability to understand something intuitively. Here are some idioms related to insight:

  • A penny for your thoughts: This idiom is used to ask someone what they are thinking about. It implies that the person has valuable insight.
  • To put two and two together: This idiom means to understand something by connecting the dots or putting together different pieces of information.
  • To have a sixth sense: This idiom means to have an intuitive understanding of something.

In conclusion, idioms related to wisdom can help us understand the importance of knowledge and experience in making good decisions and judgments. By incorporating these idioms into our conversations, we can express ourselves more effectively and also appreciate the value of wisdom.

Using Knowledge Idioms in Everyday Conversations

As we continue to improve our English communication skills, using idioms related to knowledge can help us express ourselves more effectively in everyday conversations. Here are a few examples of knowledge idioms that we can use:

  • A wealth of knowledge – This idiom means that someone has a lot of knowledge or information. For example, “My history teacher has a wealth of knowledge about World War II.”
  • Pick someone’s brain – This idiom means to ask someone for advice or information. For example, “I need to pick my friend’s brain about the best restaurants in town.”
  • Learn the ropes – This idiom means to learn the basics of something. For example, “I’m still learning the ropes of my new job.”
  • Know something inside out – This idiom means to know something very well. For example, “I know this book inside out because I’ve read it so many times.”
  • A little bird told me – This idiom is used when you don’t want to reveal where you got your information from. For example, “A little bird told me that you’re planning a surprise party for your sister.”
  • Two heads are better than one – This idiom means that it’s better to work with someone else or get a second opinion when solving a problem. For example, “Let’s work on this project together – two heads are better than one!”
  • Under one’s belt – This idiom means that someone has gained experience or knowledge in a particular area. For example, “I have a few years of teaching experience under my belt.”
  • Pick his brain – This idiom means to ask someone for advice or information, usually because they have expertise in a certain area. For example, “I need to pick my colleague’s brain about the best way to approach this project.”
  • Be common knowledge – This idiom means that something is widely known or understood. For example, “It’s common knowledge that smoking is bad for your health.”
  • A penny for your thoughts – This is a phrase used to ask someone what they’re thinking or feeling. For example, “You look deep in thought – a penny for your thoughts?”

By using these idioms, we can make our conversations more interesting and engaging. Here are some example sentences:

  • “My co-worker has a wealth of knowledge about computer programming.”
  • “Can I pick your brain about the best hiking trails in this area?”
  • “It takes time to learn the ropes of a new job, but I’m getting there.”
  • “I know this recipe inside out because I’ve been making it for years.”
  • “A little bird told me that you’re planning to propose to your girlfriend. Is that true?”
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Remember, using idioms in conversations can be fun and helpful, but it’s important to use them appropriately and in the right context.

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