LOSE vs LOOSE | Commonly Confused Words | Definition & Examples

Homonyms LOSE vs LOOSE are words that sound the same when pronounced, but are spelled differently and have different meanings.

Difference between LOSE vs LOOSE

Lose | Definition & Examples

Many people make this mistake. They inevitably interchange the words loose and lose while writing.

LOSE means to suffer a loss or defeat. 

Thus, you would write:

  • Wrong: I don’t want to loose you.
  • Correct: I don’t want to lose you.

Other examples:

  • Sit down or you’ll lose your seat.
  • The train was losing speed.
  • The business is losing money.
  • Hurry—there’s no time to lose!
  • I’m trying to lose weight so I have to steer clear of fattening foods.
  • I’m trying to lose weight.

Loose | Definition & Examples

LOOSE means not firm or not fitting. 

In this context, you would write,

  • Wrong: My shirt is lose.
  • Correct: My shirt is loose.

Other examples:

  • The potatoes were sold loose, not in bags.
  • The sheep had got out and were loose on the road.
  • She usually wears her hair loose.
  • Tom likes to wear loose-fitting clothes.
  • She usually wears her hair loose.

Confused Words – LOSE and LOOSE | Infographic

LOSE vs LOOSE

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List of Commonly Confused Words in English - English Study OnlineZinminaungMargarette Recent comment authors
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Margarette
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Margarette

What is the difference between lose and loose?

Zinminaung
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Zinminaung

I STUDY THE LANGUAGE

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