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School Idioms: 10 Useful Idioms Relating to School for ESL Learners

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Welcome to our article on school idioms! If you’re learning English, you may have come across some idioms related to school and education. These expressions are not only useful for understanding native speakers, but they can also make your English sound more natural and fluent. In this article, we’ll explore some common school idioms and provide examples to help you understand how to use them in context.

School Idioms

In this section, we will cover some of the most common school idioms that you may encounter in an English-speaking classroom. These idioms are not only useful for understanding what your teacher or classmates are saying, but they can also help you improve your English skills.

School Idiom – Image

School Idioms

Classroom Related Idioms

Classroom-related idioms are idioms that are used to describe situations that happen in the classroom. Here are some examples:

  • Teacher’s pet: This idiom is used to describe a student who is the teacher’s favorite. They may get special treatment or be given easier tasks.
  • Raise your hand: This idiom means to lift your hand in the air to indicate that you have a question or comment.
  • Be in hot water: This idiom means to be in trouble or facing consequences for something you did wrong.

Homework Related Idioms

Homework-related idioms are idioms that are used to describe situations related to homework or studying. Here are some examples:

  • Burn the midnight oil: This idiom means to stay up late at night to study or do homework.
  • Hit the books: This idiom means to study or do homework.
  • Draw a blank: This idiom means to be unable to remember or think of something.

Exam Related Idioms

Exam-related idioms are idioms that are used to describe situations related to exams or tests. Here are some examples:

  • Pass with flying colors: This idiom means to pass an exam or test with a very high score.
  • Cram for an exam: This idiom means to study intensively for an exam in a short amount of time.
  • Blank out: This idiom means to forget everything you studied during an exam.
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Learning these common school idioms can help you better understand English and communicate more effectively in the classroom. Practice using them in conversations with your classmates and teachers to improve your fluency and confidence in English.

Idioms About Learning

Learning is a never-ending process, and we all require it to grow and succeed in life. In this section, we will explore some of the most commonly used idioms related to learning.

Learning Process Idioms

Learning can be a challenging process, and sometimes, we need to push ourselves to keep going. Here are some idioms that describe the learning process:

  • Hit the books: This idiom means to study hard or to start studying.
  • Burn the midnight oil: This idiom means to study or work late into the night.
  • Learn the ropes: This idiom means to learn the basics or to become familiar with a new situation.
  • Get the hang of it: This idiom means to become skilled or proficient at something.

Achievement Idioms

Learning is not just about the process, but also about the achievements we make along the way. Here are some idioms that describe academic achievement:

  • Pass with flying colors: This idiom means to pass a test or exam with a very high score.
  • Ace a test: This idiom means to do extremely well on a test or exam.
  • Make the grade: This idiom means to meet a certain standard or to achieve a particular level of success.
  • Brainy: This idiom means to be exceptionally intelligent or smart.

Learning can be a challenging process, but with the right attitude and effort, we can achieve great things. By using these idioms, we can express our experiences and achievements in a more interesting and engaging way.

List of Common School Idioms/Phrases

Idiom/Phrase Meaning
Bookworm Someone who reads a lot
Brainstorm something To think of new ideas
Skip class To not go to school when you should
Teacher’s pet The teacher’s favorite student
As easy as ABC Very easy
Cover a lot of ground Complete a lot of material in a class
Eager beaver Someone who works hard and is very enthusiastic
Copycat Someone who copies the work of another person
Dropout To stop attending school
Pass with flying colors To pass an exam or test with a high score or grade
Pull an all-nighter To stay up all night studying or working on a project
Hit the books To start studying
Cram To study intensely for a short period of time
Flunk out To fail a course or exam and be forced to leave school
Ace a test To do extremely well on a test
Graduation goggles The feeling of nostalgia and sentimentality towards school when it’s about to end
Senioritis The tendency to become lazy or apathetic towards schoolwork during the final year of high school or college
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Using Idioms in Everyday Conversations

As we have seen, idioms are an essential part of everyday English conversations. They add color, humor, and depth to our language, making it more interesting and engaging. However, using idioms correctly can be tricky, especially for non-native speakers.

The key to using idioms effectively is to understand their meanings and contexts. Idioms often have a figurative meaning that is different from their literal meaning, so it’s important to learn them in context. For example, the idiom “hit the books” means to study hard, but it wouldn’t make sense if taken literally.

One way to learn idioms is to read books, watch movies, and listen to music in English. These sources often use idioms in context, which can help you understand their meanings and usage. You can also use online resources, such as idiom dictionaries and quizzes, to practice using idioms.

Another important aspect of using idioms is knowing when and where to use them. Idioms are often used in informal contexts, such as conversations with friends and family. They may not be appropriate in formal contexts, such as job interviews or business meetings. It’s important to use your judgment and consider the context before using an idiom.

Finally, it’s essential to practice using idioms in conversation. The more you use them, the more natural they will become. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes – it’s all part of the learning process. With practice and patience, you will become more confident in using idioms in everyday conversations.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What are some common idioms used in school settings?

In school settings, there are many idioms that are commonly used. Some of the most common idioms include “hit the books,” “ace a test,” “pass with flying colors,” and “learn the ropes.” These idioms are used to describe studying, doing well on a test, succeeding, and becoming familiar with something new.

What are some idioms that kids can easily learn?

Kids can easily learn idioms that are related to school and education. Some of the most common school idioms that kids can easily learn include “piece of cake,” “teacher’s pet,” “bookworm,” and “class clown.” These idioms are used to describe something that is easy, a student who is the favorite of the teacher, a student who loves to read, and a student who is always making jokes.

How can English learners best understand and use school idioms?

English learners can best understand and use school idioms by practicing them in context. It’s important to learn the meaning of each idiom, as well as when and how to use them. One way to practice is to read books, watch movies, and listen to songs that use school idioms. Another way is to practice using them in conversations with native speakers.

What are some back-to-school idioms and their meanings?

There are many back-to-school idioms that are commonly used. Some of the most popular back-to-school idioms include “back to the grindstone,” “hit the ground running,” “get into the swing of things,” and “put one’s nose to the grindstone.” These idioms are used to describe returning to school and getting back into the routine of studying and learning.

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